Lecture Program

Fall 2019–2020 Lecture Series

All lectures are held on Sunday afternoons at 3:00 p.m. in Sabin Hall Room G90 on the UWM Campus (3413 North Downer, corner of Newport and Downer Avenues), unless otherwise indicated. Parking is available on nearby streets.

All lectures are free and open to the public and followed by refreshments. They are co-sponsored by the Departments of Anthropology, Foreign Languages and Literature-Classics, and Art History at UW-Milwaukee.

Fall, 2019

Sunday, September 29, 2019, 3:00pm
Andrew L. Goldman, Professor of History, Gonzaga University
Title: Helmets from the Sea: Military Finds from the Battle of the Aegates Islands (241 BCE)

Saturday, October 5, 2019, 1:00-4:00pm
International Archaeology Day
Title: ‘Hands on Archaeology’
Location: Schlitz Audubon Nature Center, 1111 E. Brown Deer Rd., Bayside, WI.

Sunday, November 10, 2019, 3:00pm
Michael M. Gregory, PhD, SNA International
Title: Missing in Action, Body Not Recovered: DPAA Archaeological Activities in Southeast Asia

Saturday, December 7, 2019, 3:00pm
Kristin Landau, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Alma College
Title: Ancient Maya Political Integration: A Case Study from Copán, Honduras

 

Lecture Descriptions — 2019–2020

Sunday, September 29, 2019, 3:00pm
Andrew L. Goldman, Professor of History, Gonzaga University
Title: Helmets from the Sea: Military Finds from the Battle of the Aegates Islands (241 BCE)

Abstract:
On 10 March, 241 BCE, the final naval battle of the First Punic War was fought off western Sicily, where a large Roman fleet engaged an equally large Carthaginian fleet near the Aegates Islands. The ancient historian Polybius tells us how the Romans won a decisive victory and forced the Carthaginians to sue for peace shortly thereafter. Almost 2300 years later, the site of the battle has been located off Levanzo Island (in the modern Egadi Islands group), and its landscape has been carefully surveyed by RPM Nautical Foundation and Sicily’s Soprintendenza del Mare. By the end of 2014, eleven warship rams, eight of helmets and a wide scatter of artifacts had been recorded on the sea floor, at the first maritime battlefield from ancient times which has ever been explored.

This lecture will discuss the ancient battle as we understand it from surviving literary sources like Polybius and will present what the new archaeological finds have revealed about the conflict and its combatants, the early legionaries of Rome and the mercenary forces of Carthage. Fieldwork at this maritime site has not only produced some of the earliest Latin inscriptions and Roman iconographic representations ever discovered, but also a series of helmets of the early Montefortino type, what are arguably the most successful piece of equipment ever developed, in use for nearly 500 years. These mid-3rd century B.C. finds are not only helping us to understand the use and production of Roman armor, but are also permitting us to reexamine the development of the Roman military during its most important, formative years under the Republic. In addition, one of the newly recovered helmets is likely to be of Carthaginian origin, a discovery that is providing new insight into how Rome’s greatest ancient adversary once waged war.

Andrew L. Goldman teaches at Gonzaga University in both the History and Classical Civilizations Department. He has also worked in institutes in Turkey, Rome, and at the Penn Museum, where he still holds a research appointment. His fields of special interest are the history and archaeology of the ancient Mediterranean and Black Sea regions. He received his BA from Wesleyan University (1988), and his MA and PhD from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (1993 and 2000, respectively).

As a field archaeologist, Dr. Goldman has worked as a director, field researcher or excavator at numerous ancient sites in the Mediterranean, including Çatal Höyük, Oinoanda, Kerkenes Dag, Gordion, and Sinop in Turkey, and Paleopaphos in Cyprus. At the archaeological field school held in Sinop each summer since 2015, Dr. Goldman uses the opportunity to teach abroad to introduce undergraduates to archaeological method and practice, with a focus upon proper data collection and the interpretation of primary evidence for understanding the material culture and social history of the ancient world.

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Sunday, November 10, 2019 , 3:00pm
Michael M. Gregory, PhD, SNA International
Title: Missing in Action, Body Not Recovered: DPAA Archaeological Activities in Southeast Asia

Abstract:
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) is tasked with providing “the fullest possible accounting” to the families and the nation about the more than 82,000 Americans who remain missing or “Unknown” from WWII through the Gulf Wars. Of this figure, approximately 1,588 are the result of the Vietnam War. While this is a small fraction of the total cases, they never-the-less receive substantial attention from the DPAA staff, who must research, investigate, and excavate “incident” sites; and when successful, identify recovered remains. For the forensic archaeologists directing the field studies, the work is challenging, exciting, frustrating, and satisfying, as they will encounter conditions—scale, work pace, topographic setting, expectations, and goals—rarely experienced at traditional archaeological sites and certainly never discussed in grad school. Often the skills of the archaeologist, as well as the rest of a recovery team, is what bridges the gap between historical research, and the recovery and identification of a missing service member, whether the individual is from the Vietnam War or another conflict falling under the purview of DPAA.

Michael M. Gregory is an archaeologist with SNA International and a Board Member of the non-profit Camp Douglas Restoration Foundation, Inc. He holds degrees from Arizona State University (PhD and MA) and Washington and Lee University (BS). Being a historical archaeologist by choice, his primary research interests are the early suburbanization of Chicago, economic practices of 19th-century rural America, and Civil War prisoner-of-war camps. As a member of SNA International, he directs forensic recovery and investigative excavations for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) in Southeast Asia. Prior to this position, he taught at DePaul University and directed Cultural Resources Management studies in the American Midwest, Southwest, and Mid-Atlantic regions. Over his varied career, the DPAA missions have proved to be the most challenging, engaging, and fulfilling/discouraging work he has undertaken.

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Saturday, December 7, 2019, 3:00pm
Kristin Landau, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Alma College
Title: Ancient Maya Political Integration: A Case Study from Copán, Honduras

Abstract:
In this lecture Dr. Landau addresses the questions of how political leaders come to power and why others choose to follow. This talk examines the dynamics of political integration between the neighborhood of San Lucas and the central government of Copán, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Honduras. The ancient city of Copán is unique for its 200 years of intensive research on temples and tombs, and the decipherment of Maya hieroglyphic writing. This extraordinary work has revealed a wealth of information about the history and politics of Maya royalty. However, archaeologists understand much less about everyday life for the majority of people living outside of the city center. Mapping and excavation in the urban neighborhood of San Lucas reveals how ancient residents actively negotiated with the top-down power strategies of Copan elites. This bottom-up approach has also inspired grassroots collaboration with an indigenous high school to teach a year-long introductory anthropology course; which highlights how major anthropological questions are relevant for past and contemporary people.

Kristin Landau (PhD, Northwestern University) is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Alma College. Since 2005 she has conducted community-based archaeology at the ancient city of Copán, Honduras, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Specifically, she investigates the dynamic relationship between centralized power and everyday life within Copán’s urban neighborhoods, providing a bottom-up perspective to questions of state formation. She also works collaboratively with local indigenous leaders to promote science and heritage education. By linking past and present, she highlights how archaeology is relevant for contemporary people.

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