Lecture Program

2017-2018 Lecture Series

All lectures are held on Sunday afternoons at 3:00 p.m. in Sabin Hall Room G90 on the UWM Campus (3413 North Downer, corner of Newport and Downer Avenues). On Sundays, parking is available in the Klotsche Center surface lot directly north of Sabin or on nearby streets.

All lectures are free and open to the public and followed by refreshments. They are co-sponsored by the Departments of Anthropology, Foreign Languages and Literature-Classics, and Art History at UW-Milwaukee.

Fall, 2017

Sunday, October 1, 2017 3:00pm
Patricia Richards, Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title: Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery Research: a Twenty-five Year Retrospective

Saturday, October 21, 1:00 – 4:00pm
International Archaeology Day
Title: Down Home Archaeology: Digging into the Past with Local Archaeologists

Sunday, November 5, 2017, 3:00pm
Sarah McClure, Anthropology, Pennsylvania State University
Title: Cova de la Pastora – A Study of Death and Discovery in the Prehistory of Spain

Sunday, December 3, 2017, 3:00pm
Tamara Thomsen, Wisconsin Historical Society
Title: Myths and Mysteries: Underwater Archaeological Investigation of the Christmas Tree Ship, Rouse Simmons

 

Lecture Descriptions – Fall 2017

Sunday, October 1, 2017 3:00pm
Patricia Richards, Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title: Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery Research: a Twenty-five Year Retrospective

Description: This lecture provides a retrospective look at the political, regulatory, methodological, and ethical conundrums that characterize ongoing research that emerged from an archeological recovery contract associated with the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery. Today, the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery (MCPFC) project has developed into a multifaceted research initiative focused on one of the largest systematically excavated and permanently curated collections of osteological and material culture remains in the United States. Since 2008 the UWM Archaeological Research Laboratory has curated all human remains, material culture, and documentation associated with the 1991 and 1992 excavations of over 1,600 individuals at the MCPFC.

Patricia Richards

In 2013, UWM’s cultural resource management program conducted excavations of an additional 632 separate coffin burials representing over 800 individuals. In addition to single interments, multiple interments composed of complete individual skeletons as well as body parts likely reflective of autopsy and medical school cadaver use characterize the excavated burials. In addition, many graves contained debris consisting of general refuse and/or medical waste. This pattern is likely associated with dramatic land-use changes resulting from the development of the MCPF property from a general county facility to its current use as home to the Milwaukee Regional Medical Center and the Medical College of Wisconsin. While the goals of individual MCPFC analyses are diverse, all research is guided by the overarching goal of returning a voice and an identity to individuals robbed of both by burial in the MCPFC.

Patricia RichardsDr. Patricia Richards is a Senior Scientist in the Department of Anthropology of the College of Letters and Science at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from UWM in 1997. From 1977 to 1997, she worked in the private sector as a Cultural Resource Management Specialist providing historic preservation consulting services to private and governmental clients. Dr. Richards was hired by UWM in 1997 to serve as Associate Director of UWM-CRM, a program that is managed as a contractual arm of the Department of Anthropology. Her specialties include mortuary analysis and historic period archaeology in the Great Lakes region. Dr. Richards is the director of the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery Project and currently serves as graduate advisor for eight Ph.D. students and two Masters students currently working on the MCPFC project.

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Saturday, October 21, 1:00 – 4:00pm
International Archaeology Day
Title: Down Home Archaeology: Digging into the Past with Local Archaeologists

International Archaeology Day (IAD) is a celebration of archaeology and the thrill of discovery. Every October the Archaeological Institute of America and organizations around the world present archaeological programs and activities for people of all ages and interests. In past years Milwaukee IAD activities have drawn upwards of 60 members of the public and have provided fun and interactive ways to explore themed topics and a variety of archaeological subjects.

This year to celebrate International Archaeology Day the AIA Milwaukee Society is hosting “Down Home Archaeology: Digging into the Past with Local Archaeologists.” Milwaukee and the surrounding areas have a large archaeological community, with archaeologists working all over the world on a variety of cultures and with a vast number of materials. Join the AIA Milwaukee Society at UWM’s Sabin Hall to learn about how local archaeologists do their research, from analyzing human and animal bones, making 3D models of artifacts and sites, reconstructing and analyzing ancient pottery and stone tools, to making ancient beer!

International Archaeology Day will be celebrated here in Milwaukee on Saturday October 21, 2017, from 1:00 to 4:00 pm on the UWM campus. Come to the first floor of UWM’s Sabin Hall (3413 N. Downer Ave.) and join us for an exciting afternoon doing archaeology with local specialists, from experimental archaeology to helping identify and analyze ancient artifacts! FREE and open to the public. Fun for all ages!

This event is co-sponsored by the Archaeological Institute of America, Milwaukee Society and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Departments of Anthropology, Art History, and FLL Classics Program.

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Sunday, November 5, 2017, 3:00pm
Sarah McClure, Anthropology, Pennsylvania State University
Title: Cova de la Pastora – A Study of Death and Discovery in the Prehistory of Spain

Description: In the 1940s, the discovery of a burial site in the hills outside of Alcoi, Spain created an international stir. The remains of up to 70 people with copious precious and unusual grave goods including beads and carved bone idols were exhumed from the cave. Several of the individuals had trepanations – holes carved into their skulls while alive – that were the first to be documented in Spain. Dating to the Late Neolithic/Eneolithic (ca. 3000 BC), the quality of grave goods and the communal burial rite suggested to archaeologists of the day that an elite group had been buried at this location and Cova de la Pastora became a poster child for the emergence of social inequality in the region. We challenged this interpretation, and beginning in 2007 in a joint project with the University of Valencia, we re-analyzed the finds and conducted new excavations at the site. We also reconstructed the old excavations and how material was recovered, moved from the site to various museums, and subsequently analyzed over a 60-year period. In the process we found a rich tapestry of scientific history along with new discoveries on the timing and nature of burials in this cave. This presentation tells the story of death and discovery at Cova de la Pastora.

Sarah McClureSarah McClure is the Harry and Elissa Sichi Early Career Professor and Associate Professor of Anthropology at the Pennsylvania State University, and holds her degrees from the University of California, Santa Barbara (M.A. and Ph.D.) and the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität, Freiburg. Professor McClure is an environmental archaeologist interested in the spread of farming in the Mediterranean and Europe. Her research focuses on environmental and social impacts of early farming societies, particularly questions of human-animal interactions, changes in land use through time, the role of local and regional exchange networks, ceramic technology, food consumption, and the emergence of social inequality.

Her archaeological fieldwork is based in the western Mediterranean and the Adriatic, and she has current projects in on the Dalmatian coast of Croatia and in Valencia, Spain. She also directs the Zooarchaeology Laboratory and Ceramic Analysis Laboratory at Pennsylvania State University.

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Sunday, December 3, 2017, 3:00pm
Tamara Thomsen, Maritime Preservation and Archaeology Program, Wisconsin Historical Society
Title: Myths and Mysteries: Underwater Archaeological Investigation of the Christmas Tree Ship, Rouse Simmons

Description: On November 22, 1912, the Rouse Simmons departed Thompson, Michigan, with a load of Christmas trees bound for Chicago. She never arrived. Despite desperate searches, no one knew where or why she was lost. It was not until 1971 that the Rouse Simmons was discovered in 170 feet of water. Since that time the story of the Rouse Simmons, better known as the Christmas Tree Ship, has grown to legendary proportions. The Wisconsin Historical Society conducted the first formal survey of the Rouse Simmons wreck site for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. Learn what the Society’s dive team found, both at the wreck site and in historical documents, to learn more about what happened that fateful November day in 1912.

Rouse Simmons

Tamara ThomsenTamara Thomsen is a Maritime Archaeologist with Wisconsin Historical Society’s Maritime Preservation and Archaeology program. Her research has resulted in the nomination of forty-three Great Lakes shipwrecks to the National Register of Historic Places. For her dedicated work, she has received awards from the Association for Great Lakes Maritime History, the Great Lakes Shipwreck Preservation Society, and in 2014, she was inducted into the Women Diver’s Hall of Fame. Tamara has worked as a photographer, researcher, and research diver on projects including the USS Monitor with NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries, and RMS Titanic with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

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